Tires for the enduro models

OneLapper

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#41
The Shinko fatty really shines on sand, mud, and banging over rocks and sharp edges.

I had a race last fall, the course was sandy with huge ruts. I was too slow through the sandy ruts to float on top. The fatty didn't do that well in the ruts. It didn't want to stay in them. Lack of speed and experience, fear of death and broken bones, also played a factor.....
 

Redwolf

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#42
The Shinko fatty really shines on sand, mud, and banging over rocks and sharp edges.

I had a race last fall, the course was sandy with huge ruts. I was too slow through the sandy ruts to float on top. The fatty didn't do that well in the ruts. It didn't want to stay in them. Lack of speed and experience, fear of death and broken bones, also played a factor.....
That's a good fear to have! (y)
 

Slayer

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South Chicagoland
#44
Regarding the factory 6 Days Metzler tires, I have been impressed with the ware. At the onset of riding the bike, I would have predicted 300 mi. or so for the rear. I did 900 miles on it and decided to go with the same tire again. That leads me to a question regarding the front tire. Being frugal and tight, I passed on replacing the front tire following the advice of an old school guy who said “flip that tire and wear out the other half”. Observing the wear on the front, I said heck yeah. However, as soon as I got the tire spooned and mounted, I noticed a rotation arrow. Question: Is mounting the tire in this manor (obviously) incorrectly for trail and short commutes risking life and limb?
 

Judaslefourbe

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Brisbane, CA
#45
For knobby-style tires, I don't think it matters than much.
That being said, I would recommend you take it easy until you feel confident that is the case.

For road tires, it matters more because they are designed to push the water out of the way, so if you flip them, you end up making them quite dangerous in the rain.
 

Slayer

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#46
Appreciate the comment, figure I will try it out. Suppose if it’s a DOT tire with radial construction it could pull apart down the road on ya. Don’t see that happening. 🔨
 

Jon

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ColoRADo
#47
Reviving this old tire thread once again!

Looking for a rear for the EX that won't just roost every time I think about touching the throttle.

The trails out here in colorado at rampart have tons of gravel and loose dry dirt, with just a touch of slick rock (but not that much). I'm currently running a Maxxis Desert IT on the rear and hating it. It's worn really well (400 miles and still looks good), but has really shitty grip in the loose stuff. Granted the torque we are working with is partially responsible, but is there anything else that will hook up a little better in these conditions? No need for DOT.

The front is a Metzler MC360 mid-hard, which has also been disappointing in these conditions and washes out easily. The stock six days were also pretty washy, so maybe it's just the bikes weight and the 4CS forks? Would sag play into this?

I've got Metzler MC360 mid-softs of my YZ125 which absolutely rock where I ride! Leaning towards those for the Alta, but I'm not sure if I'm atributing some of the handling to the tires when it's really just the lighter bike.

TL;DR any suggestions to get the rear to hook up in the loose and dry?
 

C5tor

Chief Comedic Instigator
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San Ramon, CA
#48
Reviving this old tire thread once again!

Looking for a rear for the EX that won't just roost every time I think about touching the throttle.

The trails out here in colorado at rampart have tons of gravel and loose dry dirt, with just a touch of slick rock (but not that much). I'm currently running a Maxxis Desert IT on the rear and hating it. It's worn really well (400 miles and still looks good), but has really shitty grip in the loose stuff. Granted the torque we are working with is partially responsible, but is there anything else that will hook up a little better in these conditions? No need for DOT.

The front is a Metzler MC360 mid-hard, which has also been disappointing in these conditions and washes out easily. The stock six days were also pretty washy, so maybe it's just the bikes weight and the 4CS forks? Would sag play into this?

I've got Metzler MC360 mid-softs of my YZ125 which absolutely rock where I ride! Leaning towards those for the Alta, but I'm not sure if I'm atributing some of the handling to the tires when it's really just the lighter bike.

TL;DR any suggestions to get the rear to hook up in the loose and dry?
What pressure are you running? That often has more to do with grip than compound or tread design.
 

Oded

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Israel
#49
The Michelin Starcross medium is considered an excellent all rounder, and may work well for your type of terrain. I personnaly found it too stiff for rocks.

I now use the Kenda 779 Gauntlet enduro. It's real gummy and wide at 140/80. Incredible grip on all types of terrain, but probably won't last long.

The Shinko 525 cheater is another good candidate. A bit heavy but get good reviews. Go for the wider size for better traction.

Trial type tires won't do well on loose dusty terrain.
 

Oded

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Israel
#50
As for front tire - I love the Shinko 216 fatty on my EX.
These fat tires can handle everything. This tire, however, does have a tendancy to throw its outer knobs. Be adviced.
 

snydes

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#51
Check out Jeff Slavens videos on YouTube if you haven’t already. He’s a old Colorado guy, really knows his stuff and does a ton of tire review videos. The Shinko cheaters usually get good marks from him, I’ve tried the 525 myself and like it.
 

Trialsman

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Pittsburgh
#52
I go old school on the front with a 90x90 Metzler Unicross with about 10-12psi. On the rear I have been using a Pirelli MT 16 120x100 with about 5-6psi. Both have the Tubliss system. I find the extra knob on the edge of the MT16 reduces the roost in off camber mud here in the East and the loose grainular terrain similar what you would encounter up on Rampart Range. Tire life is very good on the front and the rear seems very good as well, so far.
 

Jon

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ColoRADo
#53
What pressure are you running? That often has more to do with grip than compound or tread design.
I'm running about 15psi front and rear. I tried running between 10 and 12 last year, but had a nasty bout of pinch flats without significant improvement in grip. The YZ is running 12 without issue. Installed some rimlocks but Tubliss is on the agenda... just haven't got there yet.

All the hybrid/cheater/gummy tire suggestions sound interesting. Been hearing more about these tires and might give them a shot. @Trialsman 's suggestions sound pretty inciting too. Just double checked my psi and replacing the Alta's rear seems reasonable, but that front is still in too good of shape to throw away :(
 

Jon

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ColoRADo
#55
Hmm. Sounds like tubliss (or mousse) is next. I tried running closer to 10psi on the rear and couldn't make it 50 miles without pinching it. Looking up some Slavens reviews instead of working this morning, and he seems to think that anyone running over 5psi has no reason to comment on tire performance.

Am I really asking for that much performance, or are some people just OK with the grip you get with 15psi and tubes?
 

snydes

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#56
Well, everyone will have different opinions depending on the terrain they ride. Oded’s terrain is probably similar to what you describe, so his experience should be helpful. I would say it’s definitely worth trying one of the Shinko cheaters IMO, they are cheap and they seem to work well in a variety of terrains, but like Oded already pointed out they are a heavy tire. I’ve also used the MT16 and it’s one of my personal favorites, but I have not run it on the Alta.

Glad to hear you checked out some of Slavens videos. His reviews are no B.S.
 

F451

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Seattle
#57
Check out Jeff Slavens videos on YouTube if you haven’t already. He’s a old Colorado guy, really knows his stuff and does a ton of tire review videos. The Shinko cheaters usually get good marks from him, I’ve tried the 525 myself and like it.
Was going to post this same info. I would go with whatever the locals are running. Slaven's advice is fantastic, knows his stuff, tells it like it is. His videos are a great resource for all kinds of moto info:

YouTube

I'm currently running the Shinko 216 Fatty up front and the Shinko 525 in back up here in the varied conditions of the PacNW, working great so far.
 

OneLapper

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#58
Last season I ran the Bridgestone M59 and Tubliss, and I loved the setup! Front pressure with the tubliss is 120 for the bladder and 7-9 for the tire.

Previously I ran the Shinko fatty. Like @Oded said, it's a great tire and shed knobbies. The M59 totally surprised me.

Oh, after one season with the fatty I had to replace the rim. One season with the M59 and Tubliss and the rim is still perfectly round.

Rear tire I run the Kenda Ibex gummy. I like it, excellent traction on roots and rocks, not the best in deep sand or deep mud but still acceptable.
 

Oded

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Israel
#59
I usually run 8-10 psi and surprisingly don't have flats (will probably change after I'll hit enter).
Most riders around here use mousses. They becoming cheap and equal lower and lower psi. Not long ago they equaled 15+ psi, so traction was a problem.

I'd also suggest rear Shinko 525 and front Shinko 216 fatty. Can't go wrong with this setup.
 

snydes

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#60
Personally I’d be sure to at least run the super thick tubes if you stay with tubes. I watched a video once where the guy actually slathered up the tube with grease and claimed he ran single digit pressures and never got pinch flats that way. I shuddered at the thought of the mess that would turn into though :oops:
 

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