Electric clutch

Mark911

Well-known member
Likes
563
Location
Corona Ca
#41
The instant surge of power you can get with a clutch isn't really my main reason for wanting this, and I realize and agree with what you note...

You noting a "good right hand" is probably the best thing you could have said... When you are exhausted and can barely hold on, trying to finish a section of slow speed janky rocks or a super techy hillclimb, your right hand is anything but "good"...

A left finger to pull a power kill lever might just keep you on the bike, instead of it looping out whiskey throttle...
Ok, got it. You're looking to attenuate the throttle under certain conditions, kinda a limp mode, even if the throttle is substantially higher (more open). In this case I'd say a simple resistor switched inline with the analog signal of the throttle would certainly reduce the output signal by whatever percent of the input you select. However, there may be cases where the output falls below the minimum value (range) and I'm not sure how the system would respond. Worse case the entire bike shuts down similar to throttle issues seen in the past. That would not be good. I suspect a dedicated circuit could be designed to prevent this from happening.
 

VINSANITY

Well-known member
Likes
136
Location
Texas
#42
For me more of a mechanical clutch would be preferred - you can feather the clutch mid corner or pull the clutch temporarily then engage the electric motor at full revs to get a quick burst of power over a big jump.

I miss using the clutch in many different ways.

A mechanical clutch probably wouldn’t be able to to stand up to the torque of the electric motor and would burn up quickly I think.

Brammo’s electric dirt bike prototype had a clutch and a multi-speed gearbox so it could be done
 

Don Thuren

Active member
Likes
40
Location
Bend, Oregon
#43
Ok, got it. You're looking to attenuate the throttle under certain conditions, kinda a limp mode, even if the throttle is substantially higher (more open). In this case I'd say a simple resistor switched inline with the analog signal of the throttle would certainly reduce the output signal by whatever percent of the input you select. However, there may be cases where the output falls below the minimum value (range) and I'm not sure how the system would respond. Worse case the entire bike shuts down similar to throttle issues seen in the past. That would not be good. I suspect a dedicated circuit could be designed to prevent this from happening.
Yes exactly!!! Design the electronics Mark lets do this!!!

I'm even wondering if the electronic guts could be stuffed inside a standard hydraulic clutch lever assembly master cylinder, with maybe some 3D printed supports that slide in?

Just thinking outloud....
 

Don Thuren

Active member
Likes
40
Location
Bend, Oregon
#44
For me more of a mechanical clutch would be preferred - you can feather the clutch mid corner or pull the clutch temporarily then engage the electric motor at full revs to get a quick burst of power over a big jump.

I miss using the clutch in many different ways.

A mechanical clutch probably wouldn’t be able to to stand up to the torque of the electric motor and would burn up quickly I think.

Brammo’s electric dirt bike prototype had a clutch and a multi-speed gearbox so it could be done
If the Alta had a true light pull mechanical clutch it would be a game changer, even more than it is... I do agree with you that the crazy torque would probably mandate a clutch off of a car haha!
 

F451

Well-known member
Likes
411
Location
Seattle
#45
I get reminded that my Alta doesn't have a clutch, or I guess more accurately, does not have a "neutral", every time I try to roll it around the garage, or back paddle on a trail. Betweeen the porky-ness and the driveline drag, I really have to put some effort into it, Lol. I often turn it on and use power setting 1 to move it around, its perfect for loading it into my truck.

Re a clutch, so far I haven't really found the need for it during casual trail riding, have actually been amazed at what the bike can do without one, but I can see where it would come in handy, especially if it could be implemented without a significant weight/complexity penalty.
 

C5tor

Well-known member
Likes
506
Location
San Ramon, CA
#46
I get reminded that my Alta doesn't have a clutch, or I guess more accurately, does not have a "neutral", every time I try to roll it around the garage, or back paddle on a trail. Betweeen the porky-ness and the driveline drag, I really have to put some effort into it, Lol. I often turn it on and use power setting 1 to move it around, its perfect for loading it into my truck.

Re a clutch, so far I haven't really found the need for it during casual trail riding, have actually been amazed at what the bike can do without one, but I can see where it would come in handy, especially if it could be implemented without a significant weight/complexity penalty.
I'll also echo how convenient it is to use bike-power to load the bike and move it around. I've turned quite a few heads at the riding area by simply walking my bike (almost) silently up a ridiculously steep ramp like it was nothing. Makes you look like a superhero sometimes. Hehehe.

I used to have a lot of anxiety about loading my dirt bikes. Timing the sprint, building momentum, and then the awkward leap of faith at the end, hoping you had enough speed to make it to the top... The very thought of it would get me in a cold sweat imagining gruesome images of dropped bikes, broken hips, and all manner of viral YouTube bike-loading-fail videos. But just walking the bike up the ramp under its own power is very gratifying. Just one more reason I love this bike.

I've since switched to a much longer and wider (and overall much safer) ramp, and it is simplicity itself. The ramp is kinda bulky to move around, but it makes loading a carefree experience. Even if I'm tired or hurting, or the ramp is slick and the bike is muddy, using bike-power and a gentle, wide ramp makes life easier. In my youth, I wouldn't have worried about the niceties of loading the bike. I would have picked the damned think up and chucked it in the truck if I had to. But with my advancing age and increasingly unreliable knees, I gotta worry about dumb ass stuff like this now!

I also agree that it would be nice if there were some kind of neutral function. I don't always need regen while riding, and sometimes I just want to coast. The bike IS quite the porker when it is not under power. Pushing it sometimes feels more like parking a hippo than a gazelle.

By the way, here is my new Black Widow ramp: (94" long by 54" wide) Very plush! (Well, as "plush" as a ramp can get, anyway.) Should probably put this under Loading section of the forum.
1581531118680.png
 

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