Alta Representing in the 2021 NMA Calendar

F451

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Seattle
#1
Just got my NMA (Northwest Motorcycling Association) 2021 calendar in the mail today and see an Alta is featured in December's photo. Very cool!

If I had to guess, I would say that is Miller Peak, but it could be any number of incredible view points up here in the PacNW. Would be fun to know where this is as the range of the Alta makes it limited to where it can get to (and back).

I wonder if they are members of the forum here?

In any case, great job on the pic, looks awesome and fun to see an Alta featured. I'm sure this will blow some minds when the NMA members spot the Alta up in the mountains.

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F451

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Seattle
#6
That Stihl MS200t topping saw mount is just too cool. I have both that gas version and the electric version. Now I want to build a mount for my electric topping saw to go there.
There's a whole thread on saw mounts over on TT if you want some ideas: Pics of your fork mounted chainsaw carrier?

Enduro Engineering also sells a mount, and there is a guy called Bill Dart that also sells them, although they look pretty easy to build if you have any fabrication skills.
 

rayivers

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CT, USA
#7
Not to hijack, but does anyone have a recommendation for saw bar length? Some of the real problem trees here are 12-16" in diameter, though most are less.
 

F451

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#8
Not to hijack, but does anyone have a recommendation for saw bar length? Some of the real problem trees here are 12-16" in diameter, though most are less.
I'm no chainsaw expert, but most of the guys out here are using 14-20" saws, with most of them running 16 or 18" bars. The 20" is just too much saw to ride with for most, and the 12-14" saws take to long to nibble through the larger logs out here in the PacNW.

I have a Stihl MS180 with a 16" bar and its ok. The chain tends to dull really fast, its kind of driving me crazy. I always have a spare sharp chain ready to swap out and file for giving it a quick sharpen.

Recently I was reading somewhere the MS180 chain gets dull fast because the chain is so small, both in length and width. I forget what the size is, but if I was buying a saw for trail clearing now, I'd be looking at the next larger chain size, whatever saw that might be.

I'm also hearing good things about the battery powered saws, guys are carrying an extra battery and claim to be getting a lot of work done. I'm a bit skeptical on that claim, but its coming from guys that sound like they know what they're talking about.
 

snydes

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Pennsylvania
#9
I've used one of the Stihl battery powered saws, and I got through more than I thought I would on a charge. I'd agree with a minimum of a 16" bar, 18" would be my preference but since we're talking about strapping one on the front of a bike there might have to be concessions. In the homeowner series, it looks like the MS250 is the first saw that steps up to the bigger chain. The smaller chains are really just designed for smaller limb work. All the battery powered saws use the small chains though I think.
 

C5tor

Chief Comedic Instigator
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San Ramon, CA
#10
That's awesome, and I would never have thought to pack a chainsaw there...
That saw mount looks totally Mad Max. Just put a slightly longer bar on it and angle it forwards a bit, and you can ride right through heavy brush, small trees, and marauding hoards of fuel scavenging vagabonds. Also good for working your way through the pack on a crowded MX track.
 

evh1

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Montgomery, AL
#13
I have a Dewalt 12" electric saw and with 2 batteries I can get alot of wood BTW. Or trails cleaned. 1 battery will do more than you think, but 2 is best occasionally. The saw is surprisingly good and with a sharp chain will surprise you. I also use the batteries on my Dewalt power tools, so it all works. My Skil type saw has a bigger battery that will hook up on the saw too. My Ryobi is only a 10" but works well on smaller stuff of course. I haven't missed carrying a 16" with my 12" btw.
 

F451

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Seattle
#15
Thanks - good to know! I was looking at the Oregon Cordless 16" saw as the batteries can be used in other O.C. tools, probably with a backpack as I rarely have to cut.
Backpacks, that is a good point. Plenty of guys out here using backpacks, or rear cargo racks for their saws besides the fork mounts. The nice thing about the fork mounts are quick and easy access to the saw.

Another consideration is top handle/climbing style or regular/longer handle style. I originally had an Echo CS-355 with 14 inch bar, top handle style, smaller, fits in a backpack nicely, great saw. But I found it tiring to use as you lose the leverage of the standard/longer handle saws. There are also safety considerations with the top handle style, you have to be more careful to avoid kickbacks, having less leverage with it.



 

rayivers

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CT, USA
#18
There are also safety considerations with the top handle style, you have to be more careful to avoid kickbacks, having less leverage with it.
I was cutting a 12" tree into logs many years ago, and about halfway through I hit a piece of thick metal, possibly a gutter nail or something else the tree had grown around. It kicked back so hard I almost knocked myself out with the back of my hand. :( Didn't use one again for many years after that.
 

F451

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Seattle
#19
I was cutting a 12" tree into logs many years ago, and about halfway through I hit a piece of thick metal, possibly a gutter nail or something else the tree had grown around. It kicked back so hard I almost knocked myself out with the back of my hand. :( Didn't use one again for many years after that.
Chainsaws are not to be trifled with that is for sure.

Each spring the nearest Forest Service office holds a chainsaw certification class. Classroom in the morning, out in the woods to be observed and graded while using your saw in the afternoon. If you pass you get a card for your wallet that you must carry with you if you're doing trail clearing on the trails in their district.

They usually get 20-25 people, mostly dirt bike and jeep types. Its a good way to get everyone on the same page, make connections, and I assume limit the forest services liability.

They also host a first aid/cpr course once or twice a year too, with the emphasis on backwoods aid, another great course.

I'm fortunate that this ranger district (which is the closest national forest riding to me) is pro orv and they value the tons of work that the local dirt bike crowd does on the trails every year.
 

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